Safely mailing an application for ballot for 2020 election at a  drive-up mailbox at the US Post OfficeDeadlines are important in legal matters, especially when it relates to tax issues.  There are estimated tax deadlines, tax return filing deadlines, and a host of deadlines if a return is audited and any adjustments are challenged. Once you get to court in a tax dispute – more deadlines. Anytime a taxpayer misses a deadline they usually lose some portion, if not all, of the rights associated with that deadline. Imagine, however, that a taxpayer attempts to meet the deadline by mailing a document that the IRS claims they never received. Continue Reading The Dangers of Improper Mailing to the IRS

The new Biden administration is clearly signaling that renewable energy will be a key focus of its plan going forward. For example, the Biden administration has set a goal to deploy 30 gigawatts of offshore wind generation capacity by the year 2030. Therefore, it can be expected that tax advisors will be seeing more questions about renewable energy tax incentives as investment in the sector increases. A large driver of investment in renewable energy is caused by specific tax credits offered as part of the deal structure. However, tax credits are strictly construed by both the IRS and the courts and must follow specific guidelines. Joshua D. Smeltzer, former Department of Justice Tax Division litigator now at Gray Reed, recently published an article in Taxes The Tax Magazine (a monthly scholarly journal published by CCH Inc.) examining renewable energy tax credits. A reprint of the article is available here.

Lawyers, tax or otherwise, understand that privileged information must be protected to encourage a full and frank dialogue between clients and their attorneys. Tax information, in particular, contains some of the most private information for both individuals and businesses. Gray Reed attorneys Joshua D. Smeltzer, David Gair and Larry Jones recently published an article in the Journal of Tax Practice & Procedure (a quarterly scholarly journal published by CCH Inc.) examining privilege before a dispute arises through litigation in court. A reprint of the article is available here.

Midsection of tax auditor examining documents with magnifying glass at table in officeField examinations involve returns with more complex issues, thereby requiring examination by someone more knowledgeable in the field of accounting and the Internal Revenue laws.  Field examinations are conducted by Revenue Agents and are normally performed at the taxpayer’s place of business where the Revenue Agent can examine the taxpayer’s books and records and decide on the taxpayer’s correct taxable income and correct tax liability.  The Revenue Agent is supposed to make an appointment with the taxpayer at a time and place that will be convenient for the taxpayer.  The arrangement of the time and place can be done by telephone; however, the telephone contact cannot be used to verify items appearing on the income tax return. Continue Reading Field Examinations with the IRS

Close-up Of A Pink Piggybank With Eyeglasses And Calculator On Wooden DeskSeveral abusive tax shelters in the 1970s and 1980s caused Congress to enact rules to prevent taxpayers from deducting losses when a taxpayer doesn’t materially participate in the activity.  These passive loss rules apply to individuals (including partners and S Corp shareholders), trusts, estates, personal service corporations and sometimes closely held corporations. In short, these rules are a wide net that catches a lot of businesses and can impact a lot of taxpayers.  If an activity is determined to be a passive activity it may not only effect the losses claimed but could trigger a 3.8 percent increase from the net investment income tax. Knowing the passive activity rules, and how they apply, can help avoid a dispute or streamline arguments if the IRS questions business activities.   Continue Reading Understanding IRS Rules on Passive Activity Losses

silhouette of young designer team standing with a white blank screen laptop and notebook in hands while discussing/talking about them new project with the modern office as background.While dealing with the IRS generally involves submitting documents or legal authority to support a client’s position, in most cases the element of negotiating is present.  Negotiating becomes particularly important in dealing with the IRS where documentation may not exist, or the law is in the gray area.  Most practitioners will find that when dealing with the Examination Division, Appeals Office, and Collection Division, negotiating skills and techniques are helpful in resolving issues in favor of the client.

Almost everything is negotiable–even when dealing with the IRS.  Negotiating face to face with someone is generally more effective than negotiating over the telephone.  Accordingly, it is good policy to always arrange a meeting with the representative of the IRS.

In all levels of negotiations there is no substitute for preparation.  This includes knowing the facts of your case, the Internal Revenue Code, the Regulations, Internal Revenue Rulings and Procedures, the Internal Revenue Manual, Circular 230 and other ethical requirements.  Also, you should have a network of other professionals with whom you can discuss your case.

The following are general negotiating tips which, if followed, should give you a greater chance of success in dealing with the IRS: Continue Reading Tips for Negotiating with the IRS

Expensive laboratory tests and analyzes. From pipette drops feces with symbol of money dollars into test tube.“No problem can withstand the assault of sustained thinking.”

— Voltaire

Businesses are started with good ideas and a lot of hard work. Companies are sustained by applying that same hard work to the challenges and problems they face along the way.  The Internal Revenue Code benefits businesses for dedicating funds to the pursuit of new and improved business components. Section 41 of the Internal Revenue Code provides a tax credit of 20 percent of a taxpayer’s Qualified Research Expenses (QREs) over a base amount related to previous research expenses.  Essentially, it rewards taxpayers for increasing the amount of money they spend on research and development to improve of develop new business components that will benefit the economy and their customers. However, as with any tax benefit, there are strings attached.  In order to qualify, taxpayers must meet a four part test and certain identified expenses don’t count. Also, the IRS has scrutinized these credit claims regularly during audit and, if necessary, forced taxpayers into court to defend their claims. Preparation and documentation is key to surviving IRS scrutiny and, if necessary, prevailing in any subsequent litigation. Continue Reading The Tax Benefits of Research and Development Expenses (IRC Section 41)

Man showing Find the right people tittle on t-shirt. Human resources, partnership, choosing partner concept.Understanding the IRS and the tax laws is very difficult and confusing.  When a taxpayer has a tax controversy matter with the IRS, selecting a tax attorney may be just as confusing and complicated.  Not all attorneys are created equal when it comes to the tax laws and representing clients before the IRS.  Dealing with the IRS can be risky and confusing for someone, including an attorney, if that person is not familiar with IRS procedure.  Clients seeking a tax attorney when they are having problems with the IRS must be careful to select someone who understands this unique area of the law.  Challenging the IRS requires an attorney with special expertise and experience. Continue Reading How to Select a Tax Attorney

Joshua Smeltzer was recently quoted by Law360 in an article on cryptocurrency enforcements:

“The John Doe summons is probably one of the most powerful tools the government has,” Joshua Smeltzer, counsel at Gray Reed, told Law360.

 “Every time the IRS gets information from John Doe summonses, or from audits, or from the threatening letters that they sent out previously — all of that stuff generates data,” he said. “The IRS can then use that data to decide what indicators are available to narrow the field.” Smeltzer was referring to some 10,000 letters the IRS sent to cryptocurrency users in 2019, warning them to fulfill their tax obligations.

A full copy of the article is available here.

Experimental or interviewing hr are asking psychological questions with job seekers.A new client presents a great opportunity, but there is also great risk that the relationship will not be a good fit. If the client is not a good fit it will be bad for both sides and result in hurt feelings, damaged reputation or worse.  Here are some steps for conducting successful interviews with potential clients. Continue Reading Tax Practice Pointer: Potential Client Interview