Safely mailing an application for ballot for 2020 election at a  drive-up mailbox at the US Post OfficeDeadlines are important in legal matters, especially when it relates to tax issues.  There are estimated tax deadlines, tax return filing deadlines, and a host of deadlines if a return is audited and any adjustments are challenged. Once you get to court in a tax dispute – more deadlines. Anytime a taxpayer misses a deadline they usually lose some portion, if not all, of the rights associated with that deadline. Imagine, however, that a taxpayer attempts to meet the deadline by mailing a document that the IRS claims they never received.
Continue Reading The Dangers of Improper Mailing to the IRS

Midsection of tax auditor examining documents with magnifying glass at table in officeField examinations involve returns with more complex issues, thereby requiring examination by someone more knowledgeable in the field of accounting and the Internal Revenue laws.  Field examinations are conducted by Revenue Agents and are normally performed at the taxpayer’s place of business where the Revenue Agent can examine the taxpayer’s books and records and decide on the taxpayer’s correct taxable income and correct tax liability.  The Revenue Agent is supposed to make an appointment with the taxpayer at a time and place that will be convenient for the taxpayer.  The arrangement of the time and place can be done by telephone; however, the telephone contact cannot be used to verify items appearing on the income tax return.
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silhouette of young designer team standing with a white blank screen laptop and notebook in hands while discussing/talking about them new project with the modern office as background.While dealing with the IRS generally involves submitting documents or legal authority to support a client’s position, in most cases the element of negotiating is present.  Negotiating becomes particularly important in dealing with the IRS where documentation may not exist, or the law is in the gray area.  Most practitioners will find that when dealing with the Examination Division, Appeals Office, and Collection Division, negotiating skills and techniques are helpful in resolving issues in favor of the client.

Almost everything is negotiable–even when dealing with the IRS.  Negotiating face to face with someone is generally more effective than negotiating over the telephone.  Accordingly, it is good policy to always arrange a meeting with the representative of the IRS.

In all levels of negotiations there is no substitute for preparation.  This includes knowing the facts of your case, the Internal Revenue Code, the Regulations, Internal Revenue Rulings and Procedures, the Internal Revenue Manual, Circular 230 and other ethical requirements.  Also, you should have a network of other professionals with whom you can discuss your case.

The following are general negotiating tips which, if followed, should give you a greater chance of success in dealing with the IRS:
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Expensive laboratory tests and analyzes. From pipette drops feces with symbol of money dollars into test tube.“No problem can withstand the assault of sustained thinking.”

— Voltaire

Businesses are started with good ideas and a lot of hard work. Companies are sustained by applying that same hard work to the challenges and problems they face along the way.  The Internal Revenue Code benefits businesses for dedicating funds to the pursuit of new and improved business components. Section 41 of the Internal Revenue Code provides a tax credit of 20 percent of a taxpayer’s Qualified Research Expenses (QREs) over a base amount related to previous research expenses.  Essentially, it rewards taxpayers for increasing the amount of money they spend on research and development to improve of develop new business components that will benefit the economy and their customers. However, as with any tax benefit, there are strings attached.  In order to qualify, taxpayers must meet a four part test and certain identified expenses don’t count. Also, the IRS has scrutinized these credit claims regularly during audit and, if necessary, forced taxpayers into court to defend their claims. Preparation and documentation is key to surviving IRS scrutiny and, if necessary, prevailing in any subsequent litigation.
Continue Reading The Tax Benefits of Research and Development Expenses (IRC Section 41)

Man showing Find the right people tittle on t-shirt. Human resources, partnership, choosing partner concept.Understanding the IRS and the tax laws is very difficult and confusing.  When a taxpayer has a tax controversy matter with the IRS, selecting a tax attorney may be just as confusing and complicated.  Not all attorneys are created equal when it comes to the tax laws and representing clients before the IRS.  Dealing with the IRS can be risky and confusing for someone, including an attorney, if that person is not familiar with IRS procedure.  Clients seeking a tax attorney when they are having problems with the IRS must be careful to select someone who understands this unique area of the law.  Challenging the IRS requires an attorney with special expertise and experience.
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One of the most powerful tools in the Internal Revenue Service arsenal is the John Doe summons. However, as we all learned from Spider-Man, with great power comes great responsibility.

Although it ultimately approved an IRS request to serve a summons for information on the popular cryptocurrency exchange Kraken Inc., the U.S. District Court for

Hour glass on calendar concept for time slipping away for important appointment date, schedule and deadlineThe multiple rounds of stimulus checks as part of the COVID-19 relief legislation may have people believing that mail from the IRS is not always bad news. However, aside from isolated situations, most people still flinch at the sight of a letter from the IRS. If the IRS sends you a tax bill, the process and timing of the response is very important.  Here are some tips for how to handle an IRS notice or tax bill.
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Businessman throwing red arrow dart to virtual target dart board. Setup objectives and target for business investment concept.The IRS has several tools in its arsenal to encourage compliance and audit and enforce those it believes are failing to comply.  One of the most powerful tools is the John Doe summons. A regular IRS summons seeks information on a specific taxpayer.  However, a John Doe summons, as the name implies, involves a group of taxpayers that the IRS cannot identify by name – yet.  Judicial approval is required, but the approval is ex parte (i.e. opposing parties are not notified or can respond before the court rules).  The IRS has used this tool to find tax shelter participants by summonsing the promoters, and most famously foreign banks like UBS, for foreign bank account holders.  The next target, cryptocurrency investors.

The IRS already successfully received thousands of names of account holders from the Coinbase cryptocurrency exchange. Many taxpayers, who received letters from Coinbase about the disclosure, came forward and disclosed assets in their accounts.

The IRS has now secured permission to issue a John Doe summons for cryptocurrency records on payments using a technology company called Circle and another popular cryptocurrency exchange – Kraken. This is all part of what the IRS has called, in public speeches, a “treasure hunt” for unreported cryptocurrency. If you have unreported cryptocurrency transactions, here’s what you should know.
Continue Reading The IRS is Hunting for Cryptocurrency Investors with John Doe Summonses

USA patriotic American flag muscular arm flex adorned in red, white and blue stars and stripes, huge bicep, very cool symbol of fitness, pride, strength and motivation. Isolated vector illustration for easy editing.The battle outside ragin’

Will soon shake your windows

And rattle your walls

For the times they are a-changin’

-Bob Dylan

A change in presidential administrations brings with it the uncertainty of what the political, legal and tax landscape will look like in the future. Statements from the Commissioner of the Internal Revenue Service and the President of the United States are starting to provide clarity of what things will look like going forward.  Here’s what we know and what you, as a taxpayer, should be thinking about as you adjust your financial planning.
Continue Reading IRS Commissioner and President Biden Draw Battle Lines