Give and Take Compromise text on paper with pencilMany people end up owing the IRS for many reasons and there are various options to resolve your tax debt.  Some of the options include an offer in compromise, installment agreement, or currently non-collectible status.

What is an Offer in Compromise?

An offer is when a taxpayer and the Internal Revenue Service settle a taxpayer’s tax liabilities for less than the full amount owed.
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IRS tax auditor man with a stern or mean expressionThere is a general misconception about what the IRS can and cannot do.  Owing money to the IRS is not like owing any other creditor.  The IRS is one of only a few creditors who can seize and sell your home even though state law may prohibit other creditors from doing the same.

Dealing with the IRS can be confusing, time-consuming and risky for someone who is not familiar with IRS procedures.  Most taxpayers are not very successful in handling their own affairs with the IRS.  The primary reason is the procedures of the IRS are extremely complicated, and most taxpayers do not understand how to protect themselves.  In addition, some taxpayers become too emotionally involved which reduces their effectiveness in dealing with the IRS.  However, no taxpayer should be afraid to CHALLENGE THE IRS.  Although most taxpayers have a great fear of the IRS, they know little about how it works and the IRS benefits from this ignorance.
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Tax forms, close up

Once a taxpayer overpays a tax, it is necessary to file a claim for refund before any action can be undertaken to seek a refund of such tax from the government. The purpose of the claim for refund is to place the IRS on notice of an alleged overpayment.  A taxpayer cannot require the IRS to make a credit or refund without filing the claim.  In addition, a claim for refund is a prerequisite for suing in the U.S. District Court or the U.S. Court of Federal Claims.  It also protects the overpayment of taxes if the statute of limitations expires.  Claims for refund take many forms, but most typically are Forms 1040X and 1120X, amended returns for individual and corporate income taxes.  Refund of other taxes requires regular forms which should be marked “amended” and show an overpayment.  The courts have recognized many forms of claims for refund, including informal letters from taxpayers to the IRS.  Form 843 should be used when filing claims for refunds for any taxes other than income taxes.

The preparing and filing of a claim for refund should be handled with care.  Only one taxable period and one type of tax should be set forth on any claim. The claim may cover several different issues for the same taxable period and type of tax.  The claim must be in writing under the penalties of perjury, and each and every ground upon which the taxpayer relies must be set forth in detail, plus sufficient facts to place the IRS on notice as to the taxpayer’s claim.  The claim should demand the dollar amount sought as a refund, plus any other amounts which are legally refundable – including interest.  In addition, the claim must be signed by the person who signed the return or, if a corporate return, by an officer of the corporation.  To file a claim for refund there must have been an overpayment of tax, which could include:
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silhouette of young designer team standing with a white blank screen laptop and notebook in hands while discussing/talking about them new project with the modern office as background.While dealing with the IRS generally involves submitting documents or legal authority to support a client’s position, in most cases the element of negotiating is present.  Negotiating becomes particularly important in dealing with the IRS where documentation may not exist, or the law is in the gray area.  Most practitioners will find that when dealing with the Examination Division, Appeals Office, and Collection Division, negotiating skills and techniques are helpful in resolving issues in favor of the client.

Almost everything is negotiable–even when dealing with the IRS.  Negotiating face to face with someone is generally more effective than negotiating over the telephone.  Accordingly, it is good policy to always arrange a meeting with the representative of the IRS.

In all levels of negotiations there is no substitute for preparation.  This includes knowing the facts of your case, the Internal Revenue Code, the Regulations, Internal Revenue Rulings and Procedures, the Internal Revenue Manual, Circular 230 and other ethical requirements.  Also, you should have a network of other professionals with whom you can discuss your case.

The following are general negotiating tips which, if followed, should give you a greater chance of success in dealing with the IRS:
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The Crowdfunding movement has moved from an internet e-commerce buzz word to an actual viable way for everyone from the smallest of artists to high profile actors to get funding for a project that otherwise wouldn’t happen.  (For example $5.7 million to make a Veronica Mars movie http://www.kickstarter.com/projects/559914737/the-veronica-mars-movie-project).   The concept is simple: creators pitch a

It is big news right now that the US government is facing partial closure.  The partisan politics in Washington are going to affect most Americans whether they expect it or not.  My list of the tax implications to the shut down is:

  1. Approximately 90 percent of IRS employees are not at work today.  If you

Most doctors loath dealing with financial reports and generally dealing with the business side of the practice of medicine.  Most just want to focus on helping their patients.  Failure to keep up with the “business” side of the practice of medicine can be devastating.  Here are my top mistakes.

  1. Support Staff – It is